Friends,

TWO DAYS TO INAUGURATION.

This is the most important week so far, so we’re focusing on only two major, time-sensitive actions – take both actions if you can!

Also, right in time for inauguration, we have a new website! Here you can take the pledge and also access current and past action items. We’re still adding features as we go, so let us know if you have suggestions.

We’d also like EVERYONE to make a big push to recruit new signers this week. With all eyes on the inauguration and associated protests all over the news, many people will be energized and roused to action, so it’s the best time to get people engaged:

  • Raise the topic with friends and family, and get them to take the pledge – remember that all are welcome to take it!

  • If you’re attending any protests or other events this weekend, tell people about the pledge and encourage them to check it out

  • Share and publicize your commitment to action on Facebook, Twitter, etc. – use your own words or the form post/tweet here

  • Remember and share our new website: solidaritypledge.com!

And as always, please take a few seconds to do our one-question survey – your feedback has been very helpful so far! Thank you!

—–

1) Protest the inauguration

Now is the time to stand up for justice and progress and show we will not accept a government of hate and fear. This week, there are protests and rallies nationwide focused on issues ranging from climate justice to gender equality and worker’s rights. Find the protest[s] you’re most passionate about from the list below, and go!

To get to DC, you can organize a carpool through this site, or find a bus here. You can also fill out this form to get connected to other pledge signers going to DC. The Women’s March has compiled a very useful map to help DC visitors. If you’re attending a protest, we strongly encourage you to check out this ACLU guide as well.

  • Other locations: Besides the Women’s March sister marches, some other partial lists of events nationwide can be found here and here (N.B. we have not vetted these lists fully), or just Google the name of your city + “inauguration protests” to find one near you!

If you’re going to a protest and would like to be connected to other pledge signers, fill out this form. If you’ve never been to a protest before, My Civic Workout has assembled this guide for new protesters to help you stay safe. And remember to encourage anyone you meet to take the pledge at solidaritypledge.wordpress.com!

2) [URGENT] Keep pressure on Trump’s cabinet nominations

Thank you for urging your senators to delay the onslaught of confirmation hearings for Trump’s new cabinet: a number were pushed back, and now Democrats say they won’t confirm some of the more contentious choices in time for the inauguration. We need to keep the pressure on.

Remember: Trump and his cabinet appointments have shown themselves to be racist, Islamophobic, climate change deniers with numerous conflicts of interest. Preventing the most reprehensible of these appointments will be a huge positive step and help progressives get out of our current defensive posture.

Only a few hearings remain, but the pressure so far has bought some time. It’s especially important that we push the Senate on getting ethics clearances – for example, Rep. Tom Price, Trump’s pick to the lead the Department of Health and Human Services, has recently been accused of insider trading, a major concern for a man set to lead the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Keep calling your Senators to urge them first to call for all cabinet nominees to be properly vetted by OGE (script from Wall-Of-Us here), and second to oppose the more reprehensible specific nominees. Top priorities are Steven Mnuchin and Rick Perry, whose hearings are scheduled for Thursday, Jan 19.

Since confirmations still need to go to the full Senate, though, calling your Senators about any and all nominees is still useful – talking points and scripts for all nominees (from Pantsuit Nation) are available here.

3) [MIT] Attend IAP course on activism & organizing

Are you worried about threats to social justice, a stable climate, and democratic values under President Trump, but unsure what one person can do? Have you been taking our weekly suggested actions, but wanting more face-to-face interaction with action-oriented people at MIT? Do you want to learn and share tools for being a more effective activist and find ways to get involved in local organizations?

If you answered “yes” to any of those questions, come to our new IAP course on Activism, Organizing, and Social Movements, being jointly organized by student members of Solidarity MIT and Fossil Free MIT. Starting on Wed, Jan 25, and continuing throughout the rest of IAP, we’re hosting a series of student- and staff-led sessions with the goal of developing together the skills and frameworks to understand and approach activism, organizing, and social movements in strategic and effective ways. The sessions are meant for all skill levels; whether you’re completely new to activism or are a veteran campaigner, come share your questions and knowledge! We’ll finish up with an Activist Open House featuring a number of local activist groups, giving everyone a chance to learn about local organizing opportunities and commit to getting involved.

All sessions meet in 32-144 at 5pm (except for Fri 1/27, which meets in 32-124). More details and a complete schedule are here. Please RSVP through the website if you plan to attend!

—–

Stand strong, and stand together. This is a big week and there will be a lot more to come, so THANK YOU for sticking with us.

Keep recruiting more people to take the pledge, and as always, share any thoughts or questions with us at solidaritymit@mit.edu.

Until next week,

Solidarity MIT

solidaritypledge.com

 

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